Journal of Clinical Sciences

ORIGINAL RESEARCH REPORT
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 176--182

Neck dissection: Clinicosurgical appraisal of 21 cases in a sub-Saharan African tertiary referral hospital


Abdurrazaq Olanrewaju Taiwo1, Ramat Oyebunmi Braimah2, Adebayo Aremu Ibikunle2, Olalekan Micah Gbotolorun3, Terry Godwin Ndubuizu2 
1 Department of Surgery, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria
2 Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria
3 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ramat Oyebunmi Braimah
Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, Usmanu Danfodio University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto
Nigeria

Background: Neck dissection constitutes an essential part of overall management of cancer of the head-and-neck region. Once the tumor involves neck nodes, survival drops by almost 50%. The aim of this present study is to present our experience in neck dissections. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective study of neck dissection carried out in the department of dental and maxillofacial surgery of a tertiary referral hospital. Information retrieved includes age, sex, diagnosis, type of primary surgery, type of neck dissection, complications, and prognosis. Data were stored and analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics Version 20 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY, USA). Results: A total of 21 neck dissections were carried out during the study period. The patients' age ranged from 23 to 72 years with a mean ± standard deviation of 55.1 ± 11.9. There are 12 (57%) males and 9 (42.9%) females with an M:F ratio of 1.3:1. Squamous cell carcinoma (14 [66.7%]) was the main indication for neck dissection. Modified radical neck dissection (RND) (Type 1) was the commonest type of neck dissection carried out (7 [33.3%]), while 4 (19.0%) cases and 3 (14.3%) cases of modified RND Type II and Type III, respectively, were performed. Three (14.3%) cases of selective neck dissection (SND) (Type III) and one (4.8%) case of SND (Type II) were performed. Extended neck dissections were carried out in three (14.3%) patients. Overall, 11 (52.4%) patients survived, while 7 (33.3%) were lost to follow-up and 3 (14.3%) passed away. Conclusion: Patient selection is essential in neck dissection in the overall management of oncologic head-and-neck diseases.


How to cite this article:
Taiwo AO, Braimah RO, Ibikunle AA, Gbotolorun OM, Ndubuizu TG. Neck dissection: Clinicosurgical appraisal of 21 cases in a sub-Saharan African tertiary referral hospital.J Clin Sci 2018;15:176-182


How to cite this URL:
Taiwo AO, Braimah RO, Ibikunle AA, Gbotolorun OM, Ndubuizu TG. Neck dissection: Clinicosurgical appraisal of 21 cases in a sub-Saharan African tertiary referral hospital. J Clin Sci [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Feb 19 ];15:176-182
Available from: http://www.jcsjournal.org/article.asp?issn=2468-6859;year=2018;volume=15;issue=4;spage=176;epage=182;aulast=Taiwo;type=0