Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 226
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL RESEARCH REPORTS
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 7-11

Liver function tests in Nigerian women with severe preeclampsia


1 Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, University of Lagos, Idi Araba, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Lagos, Idi Araba, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Ifeoma C Udenze
Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine of the University of Lagos, Idi Araba, Lagos 12003, Lagos
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1595-9587.137241

Rights and Permissions

Background: Preeclampsia is a common complication of pregnancy with high maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. The new American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) guideline now includes elevation of liver enzymes as a criterion for the diagnosis of preeclampsia. Objectives: The objectives of this study is to compare liver function tests in preeclampsia and normotensive pregnancy and determine their relationship with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma creatinine, and uric acid levels in Nigerian women with severe preeclampsia. Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study of 46 women with severe preeclampsia and 21 pregnant women as controls. These women attended the Antenatal Clinic at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos where women were consecutively recruited. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the systolic blood pressure (P = 0.002), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.004), plasma creatinine (P = 0.007), uric acid (P = 0.0001), plasma albumin (P = 0.029), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (P = 0.0001), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (P = 0.0001), γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) (P = 0.035), and unconjugated bilirubin (P = 0.023) between the group with severe preeclampsia and the normotensive pregnancy control group. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was however not significantly elevated. AST elevation was the most common anomaly in severe preeclampsia occurring in 54.3% of cases. There was no association between systolic and diastolic blood pressure, plasma creatinine, and uric acid in severe preeclampsia with and without abnormal liver function tests. Conclusion: Elevation of AST, ALP, GGT, and unconjugated bilirubin are common in Nigerian women with severe preeclampsia but may not all be of liver origin. These parameters were also not associated with indices of disease severity. The use of liver enzyme concentrations as adjuncts in preeclampsia diagnosis should be applied with caution in Nigerian women with preeclampsia.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2497    
    Printed82    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded240    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal