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ORIGINAL RESEARCH REPORT
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 12-16

Grade of a doctor does not influence acquisition of knowledge and skill during CPR training in a developing country


1 Department of Surgery, Neurosurgical Unit, College of Medicine, University of Lagos and Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Anaesthesia, College of Medicine, University of Lagos and Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria
3 Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Lagos and Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Olufemi B Bankole
Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, P.M.B 12003, Lagos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1595-9587.137243

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Background: Our teaching hospitals have different grades of doctors with varied exposure to cardiac arrest settings and their resuscitation skills are often inadequate. Objectives: We investigated whether the grade of a doctor influenced acquisition of knowledge and skill during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Doctors who attended a two-day resuscitation training program between December 2007 and April 2009 were scored on their knowledge of Basic Life Support, Advanced Life Support, and performance at five skill stations. A pass mark was awarded for a post-test score ≥ 75% and a pass in all skill stations. Results: A total of 130 doctors were studied with a mean of 10.99 ± 6.51 years since medical qualification (range, 2-28 years). The mean pre-test score was 54.43 ± 16.10% (range 30.5-91.8%) while the mean post-test score was 88.48 ± 6.8% (range, 54.6-94%), (P < 0.001). Mean post-test scores were not significantly different between grades. Mean scores for questions on Basic Life Support, defibrillator use, and drug therapy and in performance at skill stations were not significantly different between grades. A significant difference however existed in questions on cardiac arrest rhythms (P = 0.031). Sixty-five participants (50%) passed the post-test at first attempt. Consultants, senior registrars, and registrars had pass rates of 59.2%, 53.6%, and 43.5% respectively (P = 0.336). After re-training at performance stations, 124 doctors (95.4%) passed the test with no significant difference in overall pass in the various grades (P = 0.605). Conclusion : Grade of doctor did not affect the acquisition of knowledge and skill during resuscitation training.


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