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ORIGINAL RESEARCH REPORT
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 22-25

Comparison of the effect of two passive stretching protocols on delayed onset of muscle soreness


Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
A K Akodu
Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, Lagos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


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Background: Delayed onset muscle soreness is a dull aching sensation that is experienced by individuals unaccustomed to exercise who begins a resistance-training programme, particularly one that includes eccentric exercise. Objectives: This study was designed to determine and compare the effect of passive stretching before and after exercise on delayed onset muscle soreness in the biceps brachii muscle. Methods: Eighty four (84) participants took part in the study and were assigned randomly into three groups of pre exercise stretching (A), post exercise stretching (B) and control (C). The participants in group A had 4 sets of passive stretching before performing eccentric resistant exercise of the biceps brachii, the participants in group B had 4 sets of passive stretching after performing eccentric resistant exercise of the biceps brachii and group C served as the control group, they had no stretching at all before and after performing eccentric resistant exercise. All participants had their pain intensity measured at 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours interval. Statistical analysis was done using inferential statistics of Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Witney U tests. Results: The result of the study showed that groups A, B and C had mean pain intensities of (0.80 ± 0.2), (1.77 ± 0.4), (3.01 ± 0.4) for 24hours; (0.89 ± 0.3), (2.02 ± 0.3), (3.35 ± 0.4) for 48hours and (1.53 ± 0.2), (3.15 ± 0.5), (4.64 ± 0.4) for 72 hours respectively. There was a significant difference in pain intensity felt between participants in group A and group C (p < 0.01), group B and group C (p < 0.01) for 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours, while there was no significant difference between participants in group A and group B for 24 hours (p >0.2) and a significant difference for 48 hours and 72 hours (p < 0.01, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Passive stretching before and after exercise was capable of reducing the pain felt during delayed onset of muscle soreness but passive stretching before the exercises gives a better result in reducing pain intensity than passive stretching after.


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